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Mobster’s Son Got Everyone to Repeat His Line About the Mafia Declaring War on ISIS

Everybody is talking about how Giovanni Gambino—son of noted mobster Francesco Gambino—declared that the Sicilian mafia is ready to go to war with the Islamic State.

“Mafia heir warns ISIS to stay away from New York—but slams ‘Hollywood gangsters’ De Niro and Pacino for failing to ‘stand up’ to the terrorists” is how the ever-subtle Daily Mailput it. The Russian government–funded outlet RT, in an early version of the story that got more than 56,000 Facebook likes, quoted Gambino at length: “The world is dangerous today, but people living in New York neighborhoods with Sicilian connections should feel safe,” he said. “We make sure our friends and families are protected from extremists and terrorists, especially the brutal, psychopathic organization that calls itself the Islamic State.”

Strong words. Viral words, even. But where’d they come from? RT cites (but doesn’t link to) a Reuters piece that supposedly in turn quotes an NBC News interview. But that Reuters article is actually just a November 19 press release, and the video embedded in it is a 2012 interview Gambino did to promote his book Prince of Omerta. To make matters more muddled, he was actually speaking to the hosts of Good Company, a local Cleveland talk show, and the conversation in the YouTube clip never touches on the Islamic State. (The YouTube clip is apparently mislabeled.) If Gambino appeared on NBC News recently, we couldn’t find that video.

So where did those quotes in the press release that spread far and wide come from? To clear things up, VICE called Joseph Savoy, a friend of Gambino’s who was listed as the contact on the press release. He wasn’t sure how that old 2012 video clip got involved, but confirmed that the quotes “came from Giovanni directly” and “that’s how he feels.”

Attribution issues aside, Gambino seems to be enjoying the attention. Even if that NBC News interview referenced in the first line of the press release never happened, his quotes were picked up by media outlets all over the world, to the point where he’s now being invited to expound upon his views. On Monday, Gambino was a guest on Michael Savage’s right-wing radio show, Savage Nation, where he said, “We have to stand up together to fight this monster [ISIS],” and claimed the Islamic State is scared to take action in the US because “the Sicilians would take action right away.”

Gambino also spread a version of the story—suddenly popular again in Republican circles—that American Muslims cheered after 9/11.

“When the Twin Towers went down you had everybody from Bay Ridge in Brooklyn celebrating in the streets,” Gambino told Savage. “I live in Bay Ridge, I saw it with my own eyes. The cops were protecting them.”

The press release says that Gambino “has fostered relationships with major movie producers, and he is on his way to building a highly respected career in Hollywood.”

Active School Shooters Are Not “Campus Visitors”

Dated October,12 2015

By Warren Pulley
CEO, RyPul Threat Assessments

RyPulLos Angeles, CA Securing school campuses around the country has become a major point of contention, with each side of the debate entrenched in the fact that they believe their ideas are the best and most reasonable. But the first thing school systems need to do is to stop designing protection plans as if active shooters are merely visitors to our campuses, when, in fact, they are killers at large.

Both sides do have some degree of support in their respective circles of influence, and in some cases, what each side is proposing just may work on a small, district-sized scale.  For instance, I often hear gun rights advocates supporting the idea of arming teachers as one of the most effective means of protection for our children while at school.  While this approach may have some effect on the active shooter, that shooter would have to encounter the armed teacher who is adequately trained to square off and stand in the line of fire with an armed intruder, and fire well-placed, consistent shots under pressure.  If all of those factors can be achieved them there is room for a measure of success.

However, in my professional opinion as a former police officer and current worldwide protective specialist, training a teacher to that level of profiency may require more instruction than most teachers or school systems are willing to dedicate.  On the other hand, I do support the deployment of more armed school resource officers and directed police patrols as a way to help in the deterrence of armed violence.  But in most cases, there are just not enough police professionals available to make a noticeable difference in the response times needed to make this approach effective as anything other than highly visible window dressing.

Then we come to the other side of the debate that insists on increased video surveillance, key card scanners, mental health legislation, limited entry and exit ways, metal detectors, student badges, etc.  Now, all of these things can make a difference – if used correctly all of the time, maintained in proper working order, are fully funded, and are used in conjunction with armed security staff.  We must remember that active shooters or armed intruders do not follow the standard protocol of using designated entry ways, nor do they wear badges that can be scanned, or stand in line to be processed into the school campus, or even really care about the presence of school video surveillance systems.  Active shooters arrive on our campuses with one single-minded purpose:  to inflict as many causalities as possible in the shortest amount of time before the arrival of highly trained, paid and competent security professionals.

And while the argument continues to rage about who is right or wrong, or best suited to draft policies that mitigate the loss of life and property damage on our school campuses, the active shooter is only doing one thing:  planning their next attack regardless of school policy, procedure or practice.

The active shooter will engage our children while they stand outside in perfect lines to be processed into our wholly unsecure campuses. The active shooter will do the evil deed of killing our children while being watched by the overpriced, high-definition camera systems that our school systems have purchased to watch and record the murder of our children.  And afterward, parents, educators and security professionals will launch into the debate about what to do.

I recently learned that a school system in this great nation came to the conclusion that the best way to deter a school shooter is to simply “move the doors on each of its campuses to a new location within the building.”  I am supposing that this idea will somehow confuse the shooter and cause them to just forego their intent?  I shook my head in disbelief while reading the article, and wondered just how idiotic we as a society have become.  And don’t get me started on one Alabama school district’s idea of simply having its children “throw canned goods at its armed intruders;” what poppycock.

The answer to our questions is extremely simple.  Let’s no longer debate the issue about the so-called “militarized look of our campuses,” as we already have that in place in nearly every school in the country with our high wire fences, armed security staffs, metal detector entry points, roving armed patrols, locked metal gates, key carded entryways and high frequency radios. Let’s simply utilize the current technology in place today.  Passive ballistic protection products are on the market which are already offered to police officers, food service workers, airline pilots and bank employees.  This low visibility and high protection option has become the gold standard for protecting against gun violence around the world.  Passive ballistic protection works.  Debate over.

http://anapr.com/2015/04/20/active-school-shooters-are-not-campus-visitors/

Arrests Show Arrival of Barrio 18 Gang in Italy

Barrio 18 members arrested in Italy

Italian police arrested 15 suspected Barrio 18 members in Milan and other nearby cities in northern Italy, reported AFP.

The group — which was mostly comprised of Salvadorans but also reportedly included two Italians — is accused of crimes including extortion, drug trafficking, armed robbery and the attempted murder of a rival from the Mara Salvatrucha (MS13) gang.

An Italian judge ordered the arrests following an investigation that began in January 2014 after a female Salvadoran accused one of the group’s members of sexually assaulting her, according to AFP.

SEE ALSO: Barrio 18 News and Profile

Central American gangs like Barrio 18 and MS13, which are known as “maras,” have been operating in Italy for years, particularly in northern immigrant communities, the report added.

InSight Crime Analysis

Over the last two years, security forces in both Italy and Spain have noted the expansion of the MS13 in Europe, and these latest report confirms they are not alone — their great rivals in Barrio 18 have also crossed the ocean.

The key question surrounding this development is whether the spread is a result of Central American migrants bringing mara street gang culture with them and setting up autonomous networks, or whether these new European based factions are running criminal operations with maras in Central America, suggesting the gangs have made the leap into transnational organizations.

Both gangs are also well established in parts of the United States and the US government has already designated the MS13 a transnational criminal organization, ranking them alongside criminal groups such as the Mexican cartels. However, despite evidence of cross-border collaboration in criminal activities, the decentralized nature and highly localized and territorial focus of the maras has always cast doubts on this classification.

There have also been reports of the Spanish maras coordinating with their counterparts in the Americas, but even if this level of cooperation were to expand, it is unlikely they would have the capacity to coordinate serious transatlantic criminal operations. If they were to seek to establish control over transnational activities such as drug trafficking in Europe, they also would likely encounter formidable opposition; in Spain drug trafficking and associated activities such as contract killing is largely controlled by offshoots of Colombian cartels, while Italy is the domain of powerful and well-connected mafias such as the ‘Ndrangheta.

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